Renaissance Fortune Teller Costume Tutorial

Renaissance Fortune Teller CostumeThis Renaissance fortune teller costume requires a little bit of sewing on the over skirts and sequins, but much of the rest of the costume base can be picked up for a few dollars in a 2nd hand shop. Continue reading

Lt. Uhura – How to Make a Lt. Uhura Costume Easy

Lt. Uhura CostumeSince I’d already done the male Star Trek costumes, figured I’d do the female version as well for the Lt. Uhura Costume. Continue reading

DIY Cheap and Easy Star Trek Costumes (TOS)

DIY Cheap and Easy Star Trek CostumesIf an Anovos replica is a little out of your price range, you can make your own TOS Star Trek costumes out of a turtleneck with almost no sewing for under $10. Continue reading

Kahlan Amnell or How to Make a Medieval Sorceress Costume (Confessor Dress)

How to Make a Medieval Sorceress Costume (Confessor Dress)This dress works great as a sorceress costume, but is actually based on the mother confessor dress from the Legend of the Seeker show. Continue reading

How to Replace a Zipper Using a Regular Presser Foot

replace a zipperYou can easily replace a zipper on a coat or other garment using an ordinary presser foot on a sewing machine. Continue reading

Loki Costume Tutorial: The Coat

Loki CostumeThis is the explaination for how to make Loki’s coat, cape, and tunic. Continue reading

Loki Costume Part 1 – How to Make Loki Costume Bracers

Loki costume bracers

Here is the second part of the Loki Costume tutorial. These are the gold bracers. Continue reading

How to Make a Shag Rag Rug from Old Shirts Easily

Shag Rag RugA shag rag rug is the perfect way to use up old shirts or other rag material you might have laying around the house. Continue reading

DIY Flare Jeans

DIY Flare Jeans You can buy flare jeans in the store, but when you make them yourself, you can add more of your personal style to your flares. Continue reading

Duct Tape Mannequin Tutorial

duct tape mannequinA duct tape mannequin is an easy and inexpensive way to make a sewing mannequin. All it will cost you is a pair of pants, a shirt, and a couple rolls of duct tape. Continue reading

Harry Potter Costume Part 1: Easy No-Sew Sweater, Shirt, & Tie

Easy No-Sew Harry Potter Costume Part 1: Sweater, Shirt, & TieThis is a quick and easy Harry Potter costume that requires almost no sewing, save for a small bit to attach the robe closure. It’s easy enough that kids can make it themselves.  Continue reading

How to Make a Skirt from an Old Pair of Jeans

Jean SkirtYou can upcycle an old pair of jeans into a fun denim skirt by adding a little bit of material. It’s a good way to use up old jeans that have holes in the knees, but where the top is still good. Continue reading

Make a Moth-Repelling Lavender Sock Sachet

Scuffing my feet in and out of farm boots all the time means that I go through pairs of socks pretty fast. That leaves me with quite the pile of socks with holes in the heels. I’ve tried darning them, but it doesn’t really last that long, so what to do with all those un-wearable socks? Make sock sachets!

More specifically, sock sachets filled with lavender. It’s a “two birds with one stone,” solution. Moths don’t like the smell of lavender, so a sachet filled with lavender heads keeps moths away from clothes just as well as cedar or mothballs would (and the lavender smells a lot better too!). And making the sachets out of old socks is a great way to upcycle socks that are past their prime.

How to Make a Hair Scrunchy

I have long hair so I often wear it in a scrunchy, and as I don’t really like going shopping, I usually make my own. Due to sewing all the time, I generally have plenty of leftover material lying around, and scrunchies are a great way to use up some of those extra pieces. They require very minimal sewing, using only a basting stitch. For each scrunchy you’ll need a piece of fabric 18 inches long and 3 inches wide, as well as a piece of thin elastic (no thicker than 1/4 inch).

How to Make a Super Easy Basket Liner

Basically this a tutiorial for how to use the hemmer foot attachment on a sewing machine, but since it’s no fun if you’re not actually making something, we’ll be making a basket liner. Since it’s just hemming straight lines with no corners, it’s definitely one of the easiest things to make when you’re first learning the hemmer foot. Once you got that down, you can use the hemmer foot for more difficult things. The hemmer foot is so much easier than turning the hem by hand and the hemmer foot gives it a much thinner, more precise hem. The machine and the hemmer foot do all the work. You just have the feed the material through the scroll on the hemmer foot.

A basket liner is nice because it always comes in handy. Anytime you want to spruce up what you’re setting in a basket, a nicely hemmed peice of calico will do the trick. We use these in all our baskets on our produce stand and on our tables at the market. They really add a cute touch to everything.

How to Turn a T-shirt into a Dress, Part 2

Here is part 2 of the tutorial. This is the fun part where it really starts looking like a dress. Adding a bit of bias tape to the bottom gives it a nice finishing touch.

How to Turn a T-shirt into a Dress, Part 1

I had a bunch of extra material lying around from some curtains I’d made, so I sewed them to the bottom of a T-shirt to make a child’s sundress. It’s a fairly quick and easy sewing project if you like to sew without doing much cutting. (And the small scraps are excellent for crazy quilts.)

How to Make a Hemp Fabric Shopping Bag Part 1

Hemp is one of the strongest most eco-friendly fabrics on the planet. The hemp used in this project came from www.hemptraders.com (Sorry, the sound in this one is rather poor after the intro)

How to Make Simple Curtains Part 1: Cutting

Here’s my first sewing tutorial. It’s a set of fairly easy curtains that are a good project for a beginner. The curtains are thin to avoid blocking too much light from the window. I did this tutorial in 2 parts so it wouldn’t be such a long video: cutting the material and then sewing the material. I’ve never taught anyone other than myself how to sew, so I don’t know if I’m being clear or confusing for others. If anyone has any suggestions for improvement, they’d be greatly appreciated.